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Meg on Marketing: The Power of Exclusivity

Article Meg - The Power of Exclusivity.  LatteOrdering my usual grande non-fat, no whip mocha at Starbucks this morning got me thinking. Starbucks has built a powerful brand selling a very familiar product, not too far removed from framers selling picture frames. If framing entrepreneurs can model themselves after one of the most successful brands in business, we could strengthen our own companies in the toughest marketplace in recent history. So what is it about Starbucks business model that is worth adapting to your frame shop? Exclusivity!

Consider what John Moore, a former marketer at Starbuck said about the ordering process:

While it may take a little longer to figure out how to order your double tall, half-caf, vanilla, nonfat latte, once you do, there’s a feeling of belongingness, that you’re part of the “club.”

Whether it’s an exclusive ordering process like Starbucks, a club membership like Costco, or a sense of community like Harley Davidson, creating a feeling of exclusivity is the best way of successful branding of your art and framing business.

The power of exclusivity is often overlook and under-utilized by framers focused on discount coupons to compete. But the truth is that it is the best way to penetrate a very tough marketplace and is best used when competition is fierce. Custom picture framing is exclusive by definition; limited distribution, sold at select stores and at a higher price. The major benefit of this is that customers tend to attach a higher perceived value to products like this which in turn allows for higher profit margins.

Red carpetHow can framers harness the power of exclusivity? Although it’s not nice to exclude people, you can be exclusive in your business. Here are a few tips to keep you focused.

Carve out a niche – Identify a target customer group, and not just one, make a list of several groups that need framing services.

 

Create a need – Think ahead to solves needs they haven’t realized yet. For example, golfers needing hole in one scorecard framed, or student pilots completing their first flight.

 

Invent ways to invite friends – Consumers that value exclusive memberships take pride in that exclusivity and will likely invite a few friends to join in.

 

Establish value for your framing services – Over the top frame displays, strong store merchandising and great website photos are a terrific way to create value by building trust.

 

Back it up with substance – Making sure every step of the sales process is executed to the best of your ability is the key. Deliver more that you promise is always the best policy.

 

Considering the success major brands like Starbucks, Costco and Harley Davidson have seen in a difficult economy, we should be encouraged by their commitment to offering a high quality product at a premium price. By following their example and harnessing the power of exclusivity framers can enjoy enduring success.

 

 

Meg Glasgow

2 Responses to Meg on Marketing: The Power of Exclusivity

  1. John Ranes II, CPF, GCF October 22, 2013 at 7:25 am

    Meg, You are spot on with your observations here. Too often we forget that we as custom framers and independent retailers have advantage in our exclusive product and small personalized type of business and fail to use this to our advantage.

    It’s funny that you chose Starbucks as an example as we recently elected to combine one of our marketing ideas while going through the Starbucks drive-through…

    https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/1009828_10100407102126563_1949768378_n.jpg

    This is just one way we invite friends who value the exclusive membership.

  2. Meg Glasgow October 23, 2013 at 11:38 am

    Fantastic idea John! I love it!

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